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Calculate the amount of protein that should be consumed
daily based on the latest guidelines
Protein Calculator - Healthy Individuals  [Dietary Reference Intakes]
Age:       Gender:
Current weight: 
Check any that apply:
Pregnant
(2nd half of pregnancy only)?         Lactating?
Are you regularly involved in any of the following activities?

Background

Protein requirements are based on several factors including:

  • body weight and composition (increased muscle mass)
  • physical activity level
  • individual's energy and carbohydrate intake
  • overall energy intake
  • presence of illness or injury (e.g. recovering from trauma or operation)
  • rate of growth in the individual (e.g. greater during childhood )
  • the body's need for nitrogen and essential amino acids
Estimated requirements:
US & Canadian Dietary Reference Intake guidelines:
-women aged 19 to 70 years old: 46 gms of protein per day (based on 57.5 kg individual).
-men aged 19 to 70 years of age:  56 grams of protein per day (based on 70kg individual).
-The recommended daily protein dietary allowance is based on a normal sedentary person.

Dietary Reference Intakes for Protein -   See source below.
DRI values (grams/kg/day)
 

EAR

RDA

Age Group Male Female Male Female
7 through 12 months 1 1 1.2 (11) 1.2 (11)  
1 through 3 years 0.87 0.87 1.05 (13)   1.05 (13)
4 through 8 years 0.76 0.76 0.95 (19)   0.95 (19)
9 through 13 years 0.76 0.76 0.95 (34)   0.95 (34)
14 through 18 years 0.73 0.71 0.85 (52)   0.85 (46)
19 through 30 years 0.66 0.66 0.80 (56)   0.80 (46)
31 through 50 years 0.66 0.66 0.80 (56) 0.80 (46)  
51 through 70 years 0.66 0.66 0.80 (56)   0.80 (46)
> 70 years 0.66 0.66 0.80 (56)   0.80 (46)
Pregnancy  (increased protein requirements for 2nd  half of pregnancy. 1st half use non-pregnant RDA).   0.88   1.1 (71)
Lactation    1.05    1.3 (71)  
Estimated Average Requirement (EAR): The average daily nutrient intake level that is estimated to meet the requirements of half of the healthy individuals in a particular life stage and gender group.

Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA): The average daily dietary nutrient intake level that is sufficient to meet the nutrient requirements of nearly all (97–98 percent) healthy individuals in a particular life stage and gender group.


Source:  Dietary Reference Intakes For Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids,Cholesterol, Protein,and Amino Acids, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, 2002 and 2005, THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001  Link: www.nap.edu



Classification of amino acids.


arrow Additional information can be found here.


Active lifestyle / athletes:


Some studies have determined that increased protein intake may be required in very active individuals involved in strength-building routines or in some cases 'endurance athletes' (increased amino acid oxidation) that do not normally build muscle mass but require additional protein for muscle repair, energy, and maintaining lean tissue.  However, it is important to note that most healthy athletes that eat a well-balanced diet do not require protein supplementation.

The ranges listed below are the maximum recommended amounts.    Many athletes consume more protein than they need even without the use of protein supplements.  

Strength-training athletes  (e.g. weightlifting)
(training sessions average over 2 hours):
Maximum recommended protein intake: 
1.4 - 1.8  grams protein/day.
[Increased protein consumption may shorten recovery times and facilitate building of lean muscle mass. ]

Endurance athletes 
(training sessions average 2 to 5 hours):
Maximum recommended protein intake: 
1.2 - 1.4  grams protein/day.
[Long training sessions may use 5-10% of the protein consumed as an energy source and thus will not be available for maintenance of vital tissues.]

Source:
Lemon PW. Beyond the zone: protein needs of active individuals. J Am Coll Nutr. 2000 Oct;19(5 Suppl):513S-521S.

Direct quotes:  
 "A variety of factors interact to increase dietary protein needs of individuals who exercise regularly. Although future study will need to determine precise recommendations, current research indicates that as long as energy intake is adequate a daily protein intake of 1.2-1.4 g/d for individuals participating in regular endurance exercise and 1.6-1.8 g/kg for their counterparts involved in strength exercise should be sufficient. To ensure these increased needs are met, care should be taken to consume a diet containing adequate energy and a selection of high quality protein foods, i.e., dairy products, eggs, meat, fish and soy products."

"Despite these increased protein needs, assuming energy intake is sufficient to match the additional expenditures of training and
competition (which can be excessive), special protein supplementation is unnecessary for most who consume a varied diet containing complete protein foods (meat, fish, eggs and dairy products)."

"Those at greatest risk of consuming insufficient protein are those whose lifestyle combines other factors known to increase protein needs with a regular exercise program, e.g., those with insufficient energy intake (dieters), growing individuals, vegetarians, the elderly, those with muscle diseases and so on..."


Excess consumption of protein:
>Activity of branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase increases.
> Increased protein oxidation  --> excess protein is excreted. (The body is unable to store excess protein. )
>Deamination converts nitrogen from the amino acid into ammonia, which is converted by the liver into urea in the urea cycle.
>When there is excess protein intake, amino acids can be converted to glucose or ketones, in addition to being oxidized for fuel.
>Excessive intake of protein increases calcium excretion in urine.
>Possible increased risk of developing osteoporosis (long-term).
>Increased risk of kidney stone formation (due to excretion of calcium).




References:

  1. Dietary Reference Intakes For Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids,Cholesterol, Protein,and Amino Acids, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, 2002 and 2005, THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001  Link: www.nap.edu  Accessed: August 2012.
  2. Fern, EB, RN Bielinski, and Y Schultz. Effects of exaggerated amino acid and protein supply in man. Experentia (1991) 47:168-172.
  3. Lemon PW. Beyond the zone: protein needs of active individuals. J Am Coll Nutr. 2000 Oct;19(5 Suppl):513S-521S.
  4. Lemon, PW. Effect of exercise on protein requirements. In Williamsc, JT Devlin (eds), Food, nutrition and sports peformance. 1992. E&FN Spon, London, pp65-86.
  5. Lemon, PW. Is increased dietary protein necessary or beneficial for individuals with a physically active lifestyle? Nutr Rev (1996) 54:S169-S175.
  6. Meredith, CN, MJ Zackin, WR Frontera, and WJ Evans. Dietary protein requirements and protein metabolism in endurance-trained men. J Appl Physiol (1989) 66:2850-2856.
  7. Tarnopolsky, MA, SA Atkinson, and JD MacDougall. Evaluation of protein requirements for trained strength athletes. J Appl Physiol. (1992) 73:1986-1995.

Disclaimer

All calculations must be confirmed before use. The authors make no claims of the accuracy of the information contained herein; and these suggested doses are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither GlobalRPh Inc. nor any other party involved in the preparation of this program shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting in whole or part from any user's use of or reliance upon this material. PLEASE READ THE DISCLAIMER CAREFULLY BEFORE ACCESSING OR USING THIS SITE. BY ACCESSING OR USING THIS SITE, YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS SET FORTH IN THE DISCLAIMER.   Read the disclaimer
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